Arsenal Pet Sitting Service
 Looking After Your Precious Pet Like It Was One Of Our Own
© 2021 Mark Ward - Website Design by Futurescope Computers Ltd
PET CARE DURING THE HOLIDAYS
As we approach the holiday season and the fun begins, let’s not forget that the things we associate with Christmas and enjoy might not be so pet friendly, nobody wants to be trying to find an emergency vet over the holidays and paying Christmas out of hours fee’s so we have produced a list of things to look out to help keep your little friends safe and enjoying Christmas as much as you. Christmas Trees The oils found in fir, pine and spruce trees can irritate a cat’s mouth and intestines often causing drooling and vomiting. If ingested, the oils found in many Christmas trees may also cause damage to your cat’s nervous system; this can result in seizures, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, and depression. As well as the actual tree, the water can also be toxic to pets, especially if it contains fertilizer and bacteria & mould, which will accumulate in the water over time. Keep the water bowl at the bottom cleaned and put in fresh water daily, if possible cover it so pets don’t have access to try drinking it. Tree Skirts that cover the bottom are often good for this. The needles themselves are also a real danger, as they can cause bowel obstructions or perforate the intestines of pets if they try to eat them and can also pierce pads on their paws. Let’s not forget as well how cat’s love to climb that Christmas tree !, make sure you have a good solid base or try fixing it to a wall to avoid having to rebuild it again and again or worse, your little friends getting injured when it falls. Even if you have an artificial tree, remember even these can be an issue if the plastic off the branches is ingested. When choosing ornaments, the real glass ones look lovely but firstly how long will they actually last ?, broken glass balls can be a real hazard to pets so maybe look for the shatterproof ones and avoid putting any decorations near the very bottom of the tree right in paws length and so temptation of the little guys. The lights are also a common cause of accidents with pets, small pieces of decoration on some lights can be ingested and let’s not forget lights are electric, its always best to invest in a set of safer low voltage LED lights. Secure the mains plugs and extension leads away safely in a boxwhere little paws and sharp teeth can’t get at anything mains voltage. When choosing the decorations, think about your pets, things like tinsel are just so tempting to a cat but unfortunately the small shreds of plastic are also bad news if swallowed. We get some empty boxes and wrap them up and put them under the tree straight away and put them back once we take away the real presents to give to people so there is always something under the tree to stop our cats getting under there. We also fix our tree to the wall or radiator with a piece of wire, this has stopped the practise of having to sit and re-decorate the tree, sometimes at 3am after one of our five cats has decided to climb it and knock it over. Christmas Plants Christmas also is a time for Christmas plants and flowers, many of these are harmful to pets so take care firstly what you buy and where you put them so the little ones can’t get their paws on them.
Christmas CactusIngestion of any part of a Christmas cactus, also known as Schlumbergera truncata, can result in vomiting, lethargy, anorexia, and diarrhoea

Mistletoe

Misletoe

can

cause

vomiting

or

diarrhoea,

low

blood

pressure

and

difficulty

breathing, or a low heart rate.

Poinsettia

Poinsettias

are

usually

only

slightly

toxic

to

cats.

But

still,

their

sap

can

irritate

your

cat’s

mouth

and

stomach

may

cause

vomiting so should be avoided.

HollyToxins like methylxanthines, saponins, and cyanogen are found in holly, which can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, nausea, and lethargy in cats. Amaryllis The red variety is popular but it’s not  liked by cat’s stomachs. Ingesting the leaves usually only results in drooling, vomiting & diarrhoea, cats eating the bulbs of this plant can experience tremors & seizures, weakness, low blood pressure or even have trouble walking. If a cat consumes a large amount of this plant, immediate treatment is required.

Hemerocallis and Liliiums

These

troublesome

species

include

most

types

of

lilies.

Within

a

few

hours

of

eating

the

leaves

or

pollen,

your

cat

will

start

to

vomit,

acute

kidney

failure

can

develop

within 24 hours.

Christmas Food

Oh

how

we

love

nothing

more

than

to

indulge

in

lots

of

food

over

Christmas

but

let’s

please

not

forget

that

many

of

the

foods

we

like, although may taste great to our little pets, they often can cause issues with their more sensitive stomachs.

Chocolate

Who

does

not

love

chocolate

at

Christmas

?,

but

let’s

remember

the

chemical

theobromine

found

in

chocolate

is

very

poisonous

to

dogs.

The

darker

the

chocolate,

the

higher

the

levels

of

theobromine

found

in

it.

Small

amounts

can

cause

vomiting

and

diarrhoea,

while large amounts can cause seizures, heart problems and in worst cases, even death.

White chocolate

Is

highly

unlikely

to

cause

theobromine

toxicity

as

it

contains

much

smaller

amounts

than

dark

chocolate,

It

does,

however

still

have

high

levels

of

fat

&

sugar

which,

if

eaten

in

large

quantities,

can

cause

stomach

upsets.

It’s

best

to

keep

all

chocolate

out

of

reach

of

your pets.

Grapes & Raisins

These

fruits

are

a

common

pet

hazard

during

the

holidays.

Candied

raisins

found

in

fruit

cake,

candy-covered

raisins

or

grapes

could

be

bad

news

for

your

pet.

Just

a

few

grapes

could

cause

kidney

failure

in

your

pup,

so

keep

these

away

from

your

pet

at

all

costs

and

like

with

children

these

can

also

be

a

choking

hazard.

Don’t

forget

this

will

include

food

items

that

contain

dried

fruits

such

as

Christmas pudding and mince pies.

Bones

It

can

be

tempting

to

give

your

dog

a

bone

from

the

meat

you’re

cooking.

Unfortunately,

most

cooked

and

uncooked

bones

are

dangerous

for

dogs

to

eat.

They

can

easily

break

and

splinter,

leading

to

an

array

of

problems

for

your

furry

friend.

Including

broken

teeth, gastrointestinal blockage, constipation and Peritonitis.

Artificial sweeteners

Xylitol

a

sugar-free

sweetener

is

found

in

many

of

the

sweets

we

consume

over

Christmas,

as

well

as chewing

gum,

mouthwashes,

toothpastes

and

supplements.

It

is

poisonous

to

dogs

and,

although

the

amounts

in

different

products

vary,

even

one

to

two

pieces

of

chewing

gum

can

cause

toxic

effects

in

a

small

dog.

It

can

induce

the

release

of

insulin

in

the

body,

resulting

in

low

blood

sugar

and

sometimes

liver

damage.

Signs

of

poisoning

can

be

rapid

or

delayed,

and

include

vomiting,

lethargy,

convulsions

and

comas.

The prognosis is good if the low blood sugar is treated quickly.

Animal Care Course
Animal Grooming Course
The Arsenal Pet Sitting Service
 Looking After Your Precious Pet Like It Was One Of Our Own
As we approach the holiday season and the fun begins, let’s not forget that the things we associate with Christmas and enjoy might not be so pet friendly, nobody wants to be trying to find an emergency vet over the holidays and paying Christmas out of hours fee’s so we have produced a list of things to look out to help keep your little friends safe and enjoying Christmas as much as you. Christmas Trees The oils found in fir, pine and spruce trees can irritate a cat’s mouth and intestines often causing drooling and vomiting. If ingested, the oils found in many Christmas trees may also cause damage to your cat’s nervous system; this can result in seizures, loss of appetite, abdominal pain, and depression. As well as the actual tree, the water can also be toxic to pets, especially if it contains fertilizer and bacteria & mould, which will accumulate in the water over time. Keep the water bowl at the bottom cleaned and put in fresh water daily, if possible cover it so pets don’t have access to try drinking it. Tree Skirts that cover the bottom are often good for this. The needles themselves are also a real danger, as they can cause bowel obstructions or perforate the intestines of pets if they try to eat them and can also pierce pads on their paws. Let’s not forget as well how cat’s love to climb that Christmas tree !, make sure you have a good solid base or try fixing it to a wall to avoid having to rebuild it again and again or worse, your little friends getting injured when it falls. Even if you have an artificial tree, remember even these can be an issue if the plastic off the branches is ingested. When choosing ornaments, the real glass ones look lovely but firstly how long will they actually last ?, broken glass balls can be a real hazard to pets so maybe look for the shatterproof ones and avoid putting any decorations near the very bottom of the tree right in paws length and so temptation of the little guys. The lights are also a common cause of accidents with pets, small pieces of decoration on some lights can be ingested and let’s not forget lights are electric, its always best to invest in a set of safer low voltage LED lights. Secure the mains plugs and extension leads away safely in a boxwhere little paws and sharp teeth can’t get at anything mains voltage. When choosing the decorations, think about your pets, things like tinsel are just so tempting to a cat but unfortunately the small shreds of plastic are also bad news if swallowed. We get some empty boxes and wrap them up and put them under the tree straight away and put them back once we take away the real presents to give to people so there is always something under the tree to stop our cats getting under there. We also fix our tree to the wall or radiator with a piece of wire, this has stopped the practise of having to sit and re-decorate the tree, sometimes at 3am after one of our five cats has decided to climb it and knock it over. Christmas Plants Christmas also is a time for Christmas plants and flowers, many of these are harmful to pets so take care firstly what you buy and where you put them so the little ones can’t get their paws on them.
Christmas CactusIngestion of any part of a Christmas cactus, also known as Schlumbergera truncata, can result in vomiting, lethargy, anorexia, and diarrhoea

Mistletoe

Misletoe

can

cause

vomiting

or

diarrhoea,

low

blood

pressure

and

difficulty

breathing, or a low heart rate.

Poinsettia

Poinsettias

are

usually

only

slightly

toxic

to

cats.

But

still,

their

sap

can

irritate

your

cat’s

mouth

and

stomach

may

cause

vomiting so should be avoided.

HollyToxins like methylxanthines, saponins, and cyanogen are found in holly, which can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, nausea, and lethargy in cats. Amaryllis The red variety is popular but it’s not  liked by cat’s stomachs. Ingesting the leaves usually only results in drooling, vomiting & diarrhoea, cats eating the bulbs of this plant can experience tremors & seizures, weakness, low blood pressure or even have trouble walking. If a cat consumes a large amount of this plant, immediate treatment is required.

Hemerocallis and Liliiums

These

troublesome

species

include

most

types

of

lilies.

Within

a

few

hours

of

eating

the

leaves

or

pollen,

your

cat

will

start

to

vomit,

acute

kidney

failure

can

develop

within 24 hours.

Christmas Food

Oh

how

we

love

nothing

more

than

to

indulge

in

lots

of

food

over

Christmas

but

let’s

please

not

forget

that

many

of

the

foods

we

like,

although

may

taste

great

to

our

little

pets,

they

often

can

cause

issues

with

their

more

sensitive

stomachs.

Chocolate

Who

does

not

love

chocolate

at

Christmas

?,

but

let’s

remember

the

chemical

theobromine

found

in

chocolate

is

very

poisonous

to

dogs.

The

darker

the

chocolate,

the

higher

the

levels

of

theobromine

found

in

it.

Small

amounts

can

cause

vomiting

and

diarrhoea,

while

large

amounts

can

cause

seizures, heart problems and in worst cases, even death.

White chocolate

Is

highly

unlikely

to

cause

theobromine

toxicity

as

it

contains

much

smaller

amounts

than

dark

chocolate,

It

does,

however

still

have

high

levels

of

fat

&

sugar

which,

if

eaten

in

large

quantities,

can

cause

stomach

upsets.

It’s

best

to keep all chocolate out of reach of your pets.

Grapes & Raisins

These

fruits

are

a

common

pet

hazard

during

the

holidays.

Candied

raisins

found

in

fruit

cake,

candy-covered

raisins

or

grapes

could

be

bad

news

for

your

pet.

Just

a

few

grapes

could

cause

kidney

failure

in

your

pup,

so

keep

these

away

from

your

pet

at

all

costs

and

like

with

children

these

can

also

be

a

choking

hazard.

Don’t

forget

this

will

include

food

items

that

contain

dried

fruits such as Christmas pudding and mince pies.

Bones

It

can

be

tempting

to

give

your

dog

a

bone

from

the

meat

you’re

cooking.

Unfortunately,

most

cooked

and

uncooked

bones

are

dangerous

for

dogs

to

eat.

They

can

easily

break

and

splinter,

leading

to

an

array

of

problems

for

your

furry

friend.

Including

broken

teeth,

gastrointestinal

blockage,

constipation and Peritonitis.

Artificial sweeteners

Xylitol

a

sugar-free

sweetener

is

found

in

many

of

the

sweets

we

consume

over

Christmas,

as

well

as chewing

gum,

mouthwashes,

toothpastes

and

supplements.

It

is

poisonous

to

dogs

and,

although

the

amounts

in

different

products

vary,

even

one

to

two

pieces

of

chewing

gum

can

cause

toxic

effects

in

a

small

dog.

It

can

induce

the

release

of

insulin

in

the

body,

resulting

in

low

blood

sugar

and

sometimes

liver

damage.

Signs

of

poisoning

can

be

rapid

or

delayed,

and

include

vomiting,

lethargy,

convulsions

and

comas. The prognosis is good if the low blood sugar is treated quickly.

Pet Care Over The Holidays